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A GAGGLE OF GANDERS

 
   
 

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Lucy Gander died aged 60 on 3rd May 1865 at No. 3 Queenhithe. She was buried 5 days later in the City of London Cemetery, Ilford and the ceremony performed by C.J.F. Taylor. This cemetery was opened in 1856 to relieve the overcrowded and insanitary conditions in the City churchyards. All Hallows the Great where Lucy's children Louisa Ann, John and Lucy Jane were buried, had been closed in 1853.

Sarah Dawson, the informant of Lucy's death, gave James' occupation as a carman. It is not clear if he tried a permanent change for one reason or another or simply turned to this when there was a shortage of hoop bending work. Perhaps he worked with his son James' firm or that of his eldest son Thomas William who was now also a carman in Bermondsey, just over the other side of the Thames.

William Wesson died aged 78 at the end of 1868 and about the same time between 1865-1871 James Gander and family "left" the City. They do not appear here in the 1871 census in either the parish of All Hallows the Great or St. Michael's, Queenhithe. Emma Douglas now 64 was living near St. Michael's at 29 College Street.

The late William Wesson's son was now running the firm at 82 Upper Thames Street and had brought his own son, another William, into the business.

It appears James Gander, 59, and his two youngest sons, James Henry 30, and John Edward 21, had moved to East London, probably Stepney, by 1871. Caroline then aged 25 was presumably married and living elsewhere but we have no further records of her.

On Christmas Eve 1871 James' second son James Henry married Louisa Eaves 36, at the parish church of St. Mark Old Street Road, Shoreditch. Their address was stated as St. Mark Old Street Road and James Henry was a carman. His father witnessed the marriage and is again described as a hoop bender.

 
   
   
 

In September the following year, James Gander then 61, married for a second time. The bride was a 60 year old widow, Amey Jacques and the ceremony took place at Christchurch, St. George's East, Stepney. Amy was the daughter of Thomas Davis, a butcher, and came from Berners Street which ran from Commercial Road to Ellen Street, where James was living. James usually lived very near to his job and very likely worked at the cooperage on the south corner of Fairclough Street and Christian Street. James Gander's second son and daughter-in-law, James Henry and Louisa witnessed the marriage.

We are indebted to Edmund Gander for the discovery of this most interesting marriage certificate. Its significance is that it mentions not only James Gander's but also his father's name and occupation, that is, William Gander, hoop bender.



2.4 A RETURN TO UPPER THAMES STREET (C.1983)

t seemed appropriate, being the centenary of James Gander's death* to make a return visit to Upper Thames Street to see what had become of the parish where he had lived and worked for so many years. [*written 1983]

The church of All Hallows the Great did not survive very long after the family's departure. In 1876 the north aisle and tower were demolished to widen the street and in 1894 the rest was auctioned off to make way for the City of London Brewery, formerly Calverts, to spread over from the neighbouring site. The parish was united to that of St. Michael Paternoster Royal in 1893.

It has not been established with certainty when the old churchyards, where 6 members of the Gander family lay buried were built over. It is is reasonable to have expected the human remains to have been disinterred and re-buried with an appropriate memorial in

   
 
 

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