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A GAGGLE OF GANDERS

 
   
 
 

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James Gander may have lost his job as a result of these re-arrangements because he had become a carman by October 1859 when his son, John Edward, was baptised aged nearly 10 in All Hallows, The family had by then moved from Chequer Yard back to No. 171 Upper Thames Street, their old address which the WESSONs had vacated to move into business at No. 82.

Their eldest son Thomas William "left" the parish between 1851 and 1854 when he married in Bermondsey (see Part 4
)

James and the rest of his family where still at No, 171 when the 1861 census was taken together with two other families, making a total of 13 inhabitants in all. Among these and lodging with the Ganders was Emma Douglas the school-mistress, now aged 54, who with her mother had lived in the same house with them in Little Bush Lane 23 years previously.

Emma Douglas must have known the family very well; perhaps her mother had taught James and she the children.

James Gander's occupation is again given as a hoop bender but he may still have still been working as a carman.

William Wesson, now 70, and his son William, 41, were still operating at No, 82 as hoop benders.

   
 

2.3 THE DEATH OF LUCY
GANDER AND JAMES GANDER'S MOVE TO EAST LONDON AND REMARRIAGE


n the 28th June 1861 the Charing Cross Railway Co. obtained an Act for the building of a bridge across the Thames together with Cannon Street Station. This was opened on 1st September 1866 being then absorbed by the South Eastern Railway.

About forty per cent of the parish was demolished to make way for this and so the locality was changed almost beyond recognition. The viaduct approach over the river cut through the Steelyard, across Upper Thames Street between Cousin Lane and All Hallows Lane,the vast walls rising above the adjacent church tower. On the north side of the street, Chequer Yard, Hand Court and part of Bush Lane were also demolished.

The disruption caused by the necessary demolitions, excavations and building of this large project for a period of 5 years took place within a matter of yards of No. 171 where James and family had been living. It is possible this caused them to move a little way out of the way, further along the street to Queenhithe.

   
  Cannon Street Station c.1866 An 1853 penny
 
 


The terminus of the South-Eastern Railway, Cannon Street c.1866

 
   
 
 
 

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