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A GAGGLE OF GANDERS

 
   
 
 

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many of whom were M.P.'s at one time or another. The official annual returns for 1814, of the quantity of porter brewed, show this brewery sixth of the twelve principal brewers with a production of over 100,000 barrels. Many years later this became the site of the City of London brewery.

On the right can be seen the entrance to Suffolk Lane and further down that of Little Bush Lane. A little further down was Bush Lane and Hand Court and opposite these, No. 86 the Steelyard, which is also shown in T.H. Shepherd's water colour.

The Steelyard was formerly the premises of the Hanseatic League, a community of foreigners, who in earlier times for a period of about 300 years enjoyed a monopoly of importing hemp, corn, linen and other things into England. It is said the Steelyard was so called from the steel beam by which goods imported into London were weighed but opinions differ about this. It originally contained a fine hall and courtyard but within its confines now was another brewery. Between the Steelyard and Cousin Lane was No. 84 the Falcon public house and a wine merchants. Dowgate Wharf was a little further along and directly opposite, on the north side of the street, was Dowgate Hill. Beyond Dowgate Wharf was Brewers Lane, formerly Brewhouse Lane. Eades and Young's premises at 82 Upper Thames Street were on the corner of Brewers Lane. Opposite, a little further along on College Hill, stood St. Michael's Paternoster Royal.

 
   
 

Communications with the south side of the river were improved by the opening of Southwark Bridge in 1819 and the old London Bridge was taken down and rebuilt between 1824 and 1831.

Further up Upper Thames Street stood Joiners Hall where interestingly, Piggotts London Directory of 1823 listed the firm of 'Thomas Gander and Co, Pressers'. Nothing further can be made of this coincidence of surname sadly other than to note William Gander probably had a brother of this name (see Part 1.7
).

A George III penny of 1807

1.6 THE DEATHS OF WILLIAM AND ANN SUSAN GANDER

n 1823 William and Ann Susan Gander were living with their two children James and Ann Susan aged 11 and 8 at 82 Upper Thames Street, Eades and Young's premises. An examination of the poor rates and church rates shows there was a warehouse and a house at this address. Their son John was born in March and he was baptised the following month in All Hallows the Great.

   
Skinners' Hall, Dowgate Hill, early 1820's
 

John died aged 2 in March 1825 but their daughter Eleanor was born on 20th September and baptised on 9th October. Tragedy struck, for William died aged 52 the following month and his wife survived him barely 6 weeks, dying just before the year's end, aged 43.

 
 

Skinners' Hall, Dowgate Hill. early 1820's

 
 
 

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